Why This Housing Market Is NOT a Bubble Ready To Pop!

I’ve written several articles on why we have no risk of a Real Estate Market Bubble popping. Here is some new data to support my convictions.

Owning a home has grown to be a crucial part of the American dream. Over 86% of buyers feel that owning a home is still part of the American dream, according to a new National Association of Realtors survey.

Less than half of Americans owned a home prior to the 1950s. The GI Bill, on the other hand, allowed many returning veterans to buy a house following World War II. There has been an increase in the percentage of homeowners in the United States since then, reaching a current level of 65.5 percent.
Since then, home values have continued to rise as a result of the strong demand for homeownership.
The following graph shows the increase in property prices since World War II ended:

This graph illustrates that only during the housing boom and recession of 2006-2008 did home values fall dramatically. You can see a similarity between the present price surge and the price spike that occurred before to 2006. That may cause some people to worry that we’re on the verge of a repeat of the housing bubble’s collapse. Let’s take a look at the past and present to see if we can allay some of those fears.
What triggered the Great Recession of the 1990s?

Foreclosures deluged the market in 2006. As a result, property values plummeted. Foreclosures were caused by two factors: As a result of buyers not being properly eligible for their mortgages, a greater number of homes were lost to foreclosure. Many homeowners took advantage of their home’s equity.
When prices fell, they ended up in a precarious position (where the home was worth less than the mortgage on the house).

Many of these homeowners decided to leave their houses, which resulted in a rise in foreclosures.
This further impacted the value of the homes in the immediate area. For years, the same thing happened. Why the Real Estate Market in the United States Is Changing The current market is very different from the one we saw 15 years ago for the following two reasons:

Homeownership has never been more in demand than it is today (Not Artificially Generated) By lowering their lending requirements and making it easy for anyone to qualify for either a home loan or a refinance in the years leading up to 2006, banks created a false demand. Mortgage lenders have raised the bar significantly for first-time buyers and those refinancing their homes. The amount of risk that banks were willing to assume, according to data from the Urban Institute,

Challenge my observation and this data? Please respond, love to hear your views!