When Should You Make an Offer Below Asking Price? 5 Clues It’s Time to Take a Gamble

I would like to share some statistics, and some observations from brokerages other than myself and RE/MAX Coastal Real Estate to provide a broad view of constructive questions to ask yourself.  I’m humbled by all your compliments in my performance, however, it’s not just me, it’s the research we network and share.

Homes are expensive, and getting even more so every day. (Also, water is wet and the sky is blue!) Making an offer over asking price—sometimes by absurd amounts—has become a harrowing norm for today’s buyers.

But even as the market rockets upward, there are always those buyers. You know the type: You visit their new home for a dinner party, and halfway through the meal, they lean over to whisper in your ear.

“We got a killer deal,” they say. “Under list price.”

How much below asking price should you offer on a house? Or is it something you shouldn’t try at all? The not-so-simple answer: It all depends on the market you’re in and other factors you should weigh before you lowball with abandon.

Every home buyer wants to score a deal, after all. But set your offer too low, and you could risk offending the sellers and having them write you off completely. As such, it’s all about striking the right balance. Here are some questions to ask yourself to help you figure out that happy medium.

Your ability to present a lower offer will depend greatly on current market conditions—meaning if it’s a buyer’s or seller’s market,” suggests Cynthia Jacinta Keskinkaya, co-founder of the Keskinkaya Dartley Team at Douglas Elliman in New York City.

So before you make any offer, determine what type of market you’re in. Traditionally, buyer’s markets come with a lot of flexibility on price, because available inventory is high and houses tend to sit on the market for longer. Here, sellers tend to be more willing to negotiate because offers are few and far between.

In a buyer’s market, I would not hesitate to submit an offer that’s around 10% below asking,” advises Chris Cloud of EXIT Heritage Realty in Haymarket, VA. “Most sellers will at least see that as worthy of a counteroffer.”

In a seller’s market, on the other hand, it’s much harder to go below asking price at all, because inventory is low, and multiple buyers tend to be interested in the same properties. So, in this case, it’s best not to lowball at all, and offer list price. Your agent can help you determine which market you’re currently in, or here’s more advice on how to tell if you’re in a buyer’s or seller’s market.

How long has the listing been active?

“By paying attention to the property history, you can get a better idea of the demand for that house,” notes Jennifer Carlson of Coldwell Banker in East Greenwich, RI. “Two days on the market? Probably not a good idea to go in with a lowball offer $50,000 below asking price. A whole year on the market, with price reductions? Go ahead and roll the dice. The longer a house has been on the market, the less of an upper hand the seller has in negotiation.”

However, Michael Russell of Ratchet Straps USA also emphasizes the importance of making sure a lowball offer doesn’t insult the seller, if you want it to be taken seriously. “The rule I’ve always followed is to never go more than 25% below the listed price,” he says. “Chances are, after fees, commission, and sentimental value, the sellers are already hurting. If you dip below that point, they may disregard your offer entirely.”

Fortunately, info on how long a house has been on the market can be easily found on most listings—or if not, any good real estate agent will have access to this information through the multiple listing service. Ask them to pull it up for you, and use it as a reference as you draw up your offer.

How does the price compare to similar homes in the area?

Once you have a general sense of how much wiggle room you have to work with, it’s time to look more specifically at recent sales in your desired neighborhood. Ask your agent to work up a comparative market analysis (also called a comp or CMA), which will show you the list and sale prices for similar homes that have sold in the last few months. Use that as your guide.

“The comparables should be your go-to on a first offer,” says Shane Lee on behalf of Realtyhop. “If, for instance, a similar property in the same neighborhood is quoted $10K less, then it makes sense for you to go $10K below the asking price.”

How badly do you want the home?

Last but not least, ask yourself: How would you feel if your offer got rejected? If you think that you’ll regret missing out on the home, it may be worth it to consider offering exactly what they’re asking for—or a bit more—to seal the deal that the home will be yours.

If you want the home badly enough, you need to make the seller an offer they can’t refuse,” advises Jenny Ditty Kang, JD, a real estate agent with WR Realtors in Louisville, KY.

However, if you think you’ll be able to move onto the next property without issue, there’s no harm in trying to score a deal.

This last piece of advice may be the most subjective of all, but it’s true. Remember, submitting a low offer is always a risk. Ultimately, it’s up to you to determine how much of a gamble you’re willing to take on the house.

Author: danswingblog

Welcome to my Blog site. I don't provide this information to boast, I humbly provide this, so you are informed of my qualities and experience. Since the first of 2017 Dans averaged close to $1,000,000 in sales monthly. Dans accomplishments lend wisdom and credibility that I'm proud of. An informed understanding of who you elect to represent you is as important as the investment you hold in your hands. Dan has celebrated over 17 years as a full time Realtor. Successfully listed and sold homes well through the 7 figure market. Advises and assists clients with challenging Portfolios! Not uncommon to be working with foreign nationals, buyers that leverage the Sterling, Euro, and similar currency. Dan welcomes the Global community, with friends in many Nations. He brings a reputation of Integrity, Expertise, and Focus. Our customers deserve the best. Currently a "FULL TIME" Realtor listing and selling homes in Tampa Bay Golf and Country Club and provides B.P.O.'s, Broker Price Opinions, B.O.V's, Broker Opinion of Value to many lenders. Manage and Sells R.E.O., Real Estate Owned properties, distressed properties! Evaluate and negotiate solutions for sellers and lenders. Developed, operated and sold a Florida "AWARD WINNING" Ad Agency! 2010 & 11 Commercial Agent of the year. RE/MAX Paramount Properties. Relocated to RE/MAX Marketing Specialist in January 2012. Successfully closed on many extremely challenging foreclosures, and Short Sale. Coached and participated in Commercial and Multi-Income Family REO's in the past six years. Received license in 2000, took the class to sell his own properties, coerced by instructor to pursue an active license. Assist residential and commercial brokers, investors and individuals with real estate needs. Elected to the Auburndale City Commission in 1986-88. Created and served as 1st Redevelopment Chair in 1988 & 89 personally put in place all the elements for the Auburndale CRA. 1990 City Commission refused to give a full vote of confidence. After a 5 year journey to personally raise funding, extensive research and study for the CRA district perimeters, and stunned with the Commissions doubt. Positioned himself to run for office again, was re-elected to Auburndale Commission, to serve 1991-93 to full fill the CRA master plan! Active with the Central Florida Development Council from conception in 1985 and sat on the board periodically for the past 25 years representing municipalities and private investors. The positions Dan held from 1986 through 1993 enabled him to have a complete workable understanding of the State of Florida Comprehensive Plan for Future Land Use, and the benefits of intergovernmental agreements, utility franchise expansions, and public/private partnerships! Specialties: Assets recovery & receivership, Real Estate Portfolio's, REO & Short Sale of Residential and Commercial negotiations, marketing consultant, public relations, and Broker Price Opinions for residential and commercial lenders.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s